18-12-2017
Call Us 855 222 1101
Email Us digspecialist@hotmail.com

Chemical Dependency

Part A- What we know about the disease

Some suggest that it may be hereditary; it does tend to run in families, and there is about a 25 percent chance that the child of one or more alcoholic parents will become alcoholic. But that does not explain why the other 75 percent will not, or why many alcoholics come from families where chemical dependency has not (apparently) been a problem in the past.

DIG is known as a trusted resource in this industry. Call us today at 855-222-1101 for a life saving consultation today. We help families like your with professional intervention services.

Other theories claim that chemical dependency is related to a specific personality type. But there are millions of alcoholics who do not fit any particular profile. The addiction Clinicians at The Diversified Intervention Group can help you easily identify addicts and/or alcoholics with these types of personalities.

Characteristics of chemically dependent people

What is clear is that all sorts of people become chemically dependent, some for no apparent reason. On the other hand, it seems that some people cannot become chemically dependent no matter how hard they try! We do know that chemical dependency is not caused by a lack of willpower, or weakness of character, or some flaw in a person’s moral structure. It is not a form of mental illness – an unhappy marriage, trouble of the job, or peer pressure. If someone you care about – it is not your fault*

How many Americans today are Alcoholic?

We also know that approximately 10 percent of the drinkers in America today will become alcoholic at some point in their lives. An estimated 10-20 million people or more are sick with the disease of addiction. Alcohol is a drug. The good news is that recovery is possible for them with help form our professional Intervention services a The Diversified Intervention Group.

*If you only learn one thing from reading this website let it be this: You are not responsible for the disease of chemical dependency that has taken hold in the person you care about. You may be feeling guilty anyway. For now however, try to believe, or at least consider, that nothing you have ever done could have resulted in the person’s illness.

DIG is known as a trusted resource in this industry. Call us today at 855-222-1101 for a life saving consultation today. We help families like your with professional intervention services.

Part B- How to tell if someone is chemically dependent

We help families heal

We help families heal
Now that you know the characteristics of the disease, how can you go about determining whether someone you care about is suffering from it? Needless to say, this is not something that should be taken lightly. Suspecting that someone is chemically dependent, and saying it to the person’s face are two very different things.

Some people believe that you cannot label another person an alcoholic; that this must come from the person himself or herself. But as we will see, the chemically dependent person is usually the last to recognize (or admit) that he or she has a problem. Additionally, remember that denial is the hallmark of the disease.

DIG is known as a trusted resource in this industry. Call us today at 855-222-1101 for a life saving consultation today. We help families like your with professional intervention services.

Here are some questions to try and determine if your loved one may be chemically dependent

The following test, while not a diagnostic tool, can help you to determine if your suspicions are correct. Answer each question with a yes or no.

» Is the person drinking (or using any other drug) more now than he or she did in the past?

» Are you ever afraid to be around the person when he or she is drinking or using drugs – because of the possibility or physical or verbal abuse?

» Has the person ever forgotten or denied things that happened during a drinking or using episode?

» Has the person broken promises to control or stop his or her drinking or using, or tried to hide it from you?

» Have you ever been embarrassed by the person’s drinking or drug use?

» Have you ever lied to anyone else about the person’s drinking or drug use?

» Are most of the person’s friend’s heavy drinkers or drug users?

» Have you ever made excuses for the way the person behaved while drinking or using drugs?

» Are holidays and social functions unpleasant for you because of the person’s drinking or drug use?

» Does the person deny that he or she has a drinking problem because he or she only drinks beer (or wine)? Or deny that he or she has a drug problem because its use is “limited” to medical marijuana, or diet pills, or some other supposedly “harmless” substance?

» Does the person’s behavior change noticeably when he or she is drinking or using? (For example: a normally quiet person might become loud and talkative or a normally mild-mannered person might become quick to anger.)

» Does the person avoid social functions where alcohol will not be served, or drugs will not be permitted or available?

» Are you afraid to ride in the car after a person has been drinking or using drugs?

» Is the person having financial difficulties that seem to be related to his or her drug use?

» Have you ever found alcohol or drugs that the person has hidden?

DIG is known as a trusted resource in this industry. Call us today at 855-222-1101 for a life saving consultation today. We help families like your with professional intervention services.

If you answered yes to any three of these questions, then there is a good chance that the person you care about has a drinking or drug problem.

Call us today for intervention services for teenagers or adults
Call us today for intervention services for teenagers or adults
Call us today for an assessment done by our Program Director who sees these signs of chemical dependency every day and can easily help you formulate a plan to begin the recovery process. Remember, this disease only gets worse until it is arrested. Remember: This disease is fatal if left untreated.

Here is a very simple definition of chemical dependency that may help you:

If the use of alcohol or other drugs is causing any continuing disruption in an individual’s personal, social, spiritual or economic life, and the individual does not stop using, he or she is chemically dependent.

The refusal to stop using – even when using is clearly having an impact on the individual’s life – signals a pathological attachment to the chemical and is one of the surest signs of harmful dependency.

In opposition, the non-chemically dependent person might have one brush with the law. He or she might have one reprimand from his or her employer. He or she might have family problems over one drinking or using episode.

But that one event will be sufficient to make him or her think, “If I’m going to have that kind of trouble, I can’t do this any more!” And he or she will do just that.

The chemically dependent person, on the other hand, will keep using the drug even thought it causes continuing problems in any or all of the relationships that are important to him or her. By these actions, he or she is saying, “Family and friends and job are important to me, but drinking or using is more important.” This is attaching an emotional importance to an inert substance – an obviously abnormal response, and that indicates the presence of the disease of chemical dependency.

DIG is known as a trusted resource in this industry. Call us today at 855-222-1101 for a life saving consultation today. We help families like your with professional intervention services.